Hey Edwin, I personally have been following one for years with no issues. I cycle out once every 1-2 weeks with a higher carb day using low glycemic carb sources like root vegetables. One of the keys for me has been keeping it simple and finding ways to use staple ingredients (such as avocados and coconut products) to make a variety of recipes.Check out this article for some examples https://drjockers.com/ketogenic-avocado-recipes/
"The diet was introduced in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy and then sort of fell out of popularity with the introduction of anti-seizure drugs," Turoff says. What's more, ketosis (the goal of keto, a state where the body uses fat for energy instead of carbs) is something seen in people during periods of starvation—including in people with anorexia nervosa. "The body is deprived of carbohydrates and thus has to turn to ketone bodies as a fuel source," Turoff explains. "People really need to understand that it's not just a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet—it actually changes the way your body uses fuel."

The main electrolytes affected by this process are sodium, potassium and magnesium. There are other electrolytes in your bloodstream, such as calcium and phosphorus, but their levels don’t change much on a keto diet. However, getting sodium, magnesium, and potassium in balance can help prevent against symptoms of keto flu and fix some of the side effects you may have long term. Read on to find out more about them.
I have serious doubts that eliminating an entire food group is healthy. What’s not being considered is that perhaps there is something in the type of carbohydrates that many people consume in the U.S. that is unhealthy, and not necessarily that all carbohydrates are bad for you. Eliminating these bad carbohydrates might work because you’re actually eliminated a huge source of heavy metal poisoning. Research done by Renee Dufault of the Food Ingredient and Health Research institute strongly suggest that foods laden with preservatives and mercury-laced processed food additives have a strong causal effect on health conditions ranging from ADHD to diabetes. If you are eating processed foods in the U.S., you’re getting a steady diet of heavy metal poisoning from the preservatives, pesticides, and concentrations of mercury in the U.S. food supply. If “food” can sit on a shelf for long periods of time without spoiling, there’s some kind of preservative in it that just might eventually kill you by triggering whatever dis-ease you are genetically predisposed to acquiring. You can read more about her research in her book _Unsafe At Any Meal:What the FDA Does Not Want You To Know About the Foods You Eat_. There is a free tutorial to help you apply what you’ll learn in the book on this web site: http://www.foodingredient.info I wish someone with the money to do more research would find out if its the carbohydrates that are not good for you, or the chemically-laden carbohydrates and beverages that U.S. Americans ingest that are the real culprit.
Certain Cancers Keto may be used in combination with chemotherapy and radiation, some studies have suggested, including one published in November 2018 in the journal Oncology. (12) But ultimately more studies are needed to determine if keto can play a role in cancer therapy, and patients should not use it as a stand-alone treatment or without a doctor’s consent.

Truly Dr. Colbert is also a reputable source for more thorough science and modification of previous Keto extremes. The statements about Keto diets with dairy everyday are not true…I am a 66 year old professional (University trained) and have found medical people often very unknowledgable or partially knowledgeable which may be worse. I ask you Abbey to dig deeper…meet Dr. Colbert-not a quack and more in depth than your overview. Personally I am finding switch to more green’s and low glycemic vegetables and fruits with healthy fats, occasional dairy and healthy protein; a way of life that is helping our whole family. Please watch The Magic Pill…the help for family’s caught in old thinking from poor science (ie. Alex Keys) and with autism etc. and so much modern disease is in itself, motivation to search out more truth.
Many people and even some doctors confuse nutritional ketosis with (diabetic) ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs in uncontrolled diabetes when the pancreas cannot secrete enough insulin to exert its action in cells, so blood glucose levels and blood ketones both skyrocket to dangerously high levels. Ketoacidosis has nothing to do with nutritional ketosis which is when ketones are produced from all the dietary fat you’re relying on and can thus keep your blood sugar levels under control at low and stable levels.
Although studies have shown that the keto diet can reduce seizures for children with epilepsy, there is no evidence indicating that keto helps with other brain disorders or improves mental cognition, according to Harvard Health Publishing. Some studies show that keto may lower blood sugar for people with type 2 diabetes, but there is not enough long-term research to determine whether it’s safe and effective for diabetics.
Note: Because you'll be excluding some major food groups on the keto diet (grains, many fruits) you should definitely think about taking a multivitamin—especially one that contains folic acid, which helps your body make new cells and is often found in enriched breads, cereals, and other grain products, says Julie Upton, R.D., cofounder of nutrition website Appetite for Health.
Familial Hypercholesterolemia. Familial hypercholesterolemia is a condition where one or more of the genes for the LDL receptor are defective, making it more difficult for them to clear cholesterol from the blood. If a person with familial hypercholesterolemia is then put on a high-fat diet, they will become even more vulnerable to heart disease as the increased saturated fat and cholesterol content of the diet provokes higher cholesterol levels. To counteract these genetic vulnerabilities, it is may be best to follow a low to moderate fat diet with plenty of whole foods, fiber, monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats (especially omega 3s), and limited saturated fats. This, as well as a lifestyle that prioritizes physical activity, stress relief practices, and plenty of sleep, should keep their cholesterol levels under control.

That's certainly the case with the ketogenic diet—a very low-carb meal plan—based on the findings of two recently published studies.1,2  Dr. Saslow and her team report that the individuals with type 2 diabetes who followed the keto diet lost significantly more weight than those on the low-fat diet espoused by the American Diabetic Association.1 These dieters also were able to get their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) below 6.5%, suggesting that some may have reversed their type 2 diabetes.1
For people with Type 1 Diabetes, you probably have heard of their diabetic emergency, diabetic ketoacidosis, also referred to as DKA. This can be life threatening condition for people with Type 1 diabetes and Certified Diabetes Educators spend many hours teaching preventive care for DKA. This condition should not be confused with nutritional ketosis, the fat burning state reached when following the Ketogenic diet. The two conditions are quite different.
Once you click the “Add to Cart” button that is right above, you will be taken to the secure checkout page. Just enter your information and then you will be given an instant access to the entire 3-Week Ketogenic Diet. You can view all the materials, the list, and the guides right on your computer, tablet, or smart phone. You could also download everything and print out as many copies as you would like. 
After reading that article I have to say that the “USC experts” are full of it. It’s the usual scare stuff that the mainstream docs and dietitians trot out to attempt to discredit LCHF and keto diets. There’s no reason why a keto diet should be any worse for bone health than any other diet provided it has adequate calcium, phosphate and Vit K2 and you have good Vit D levels. As for the recommendations of dietitians – eat lots of healthywholegrains and “vegetable” oils but no saturated fats – we know what the long-term results are of that: diabetes, heart disease and osteoporosis.
Here’s another controversial yet promising area of study: Research suggests that when patients with diabetes take on a low-carb diet (like keto), they experience improvements in insulin sensitivity by up to 75 percent, as well as a reduction in blood sugar control medications. What we aren’t sure of, however, is whether these improvements are due specifically to the effects of ketosis or to weight loss in general, so similar results could theoretically be found with any successful diet.
The upsides: While the precise mechanisms are unclear, ketosis is thought to have brain-protecting benefits: As many as half of young people with epilepsy had fewer seizures after following the diet. And some early research suggests it may have benefits for blood sugar control among people with diabetes. An upcoming study will look at the ketogenic diet as a weight maintenance strategy.
A related clinical diet for drug-resistant epilepsy is called the medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet, in which MCT oil is extensively used because it’s more ketogenic than long-chain triglycerides. (13) Another dietary therapy for epilepsy called Low Glycemic Index Treatment (LGIT) was developed in 2002 as an alternative to the keto diet. LGIT monitors the total amount of carbohydrates consumed daily, and focuses on carbohydrates that have a low glycemic index.) (14)
It’s best to approach this change in eating as a way to feel better and become healthier, rather than as a “fad diet” or weight loss quick-fix. Dr. Cabeca recommends giving it six months to test the effects, keeping in mind that some trial and error is expected along the way. The diet should ideally be approached in step-wise fashion, focusing on alkaline first before adding in fasting and the keto aspect.
There are seemingly endless options to curate a diet to meet every notion or need. However, those living with diabetes may find that these diets don’t always work to balance glycemic control and blood sugar. So what about the ketogenic diet? Is it a fad that will one day be supplanted by the next newest way to eat, or will the science behind it ensure it keeps a lifelong and loyal following? And if the latter, what role can it play in the lives of those living with diabetes?

To understand what the keto diet is, you have to understand a little about how your body generates and uses energy for daily activity. All day, every day, your body undertakes a series of chemical processes (together referred to as metabolism) to break down and use a combination of carbohydrates and fats to produce energy. The energy produced is used for everything -- from breathing to brushing your teeth to running to catch a taxi. Your body is burning fuel constantly just to sustain basic life function. And while your body is always burning a combination of fats and carbohydrates, your brain’s primary fuel source is carbohydrates… and your brain requires a surprising amount of energy to get you through each day.
I know a few people who struggle with keeping on the low carb diet and staying in ketosis. They introduced me to a exogenous drink called keto/os that is a natural energy drink that contains ketones. It gets you into ketosis within an hour!!! This can be tested in the blood and they showed me the results and it works!!! Not only that but it dropped their blood sugars as well. I am now on the product myself for other reasons but just thought I would share it. Let me know if you want more info.
The ketogenic diet is usually something that’s prescribed by a registered dietitian. For example, Jessica Lowe, a Keck School of Medicine of USC ketogenic dietitian, said she might prescribe it to a patient who has epilepsy, since there’s research that shows it can help control seizures. There’s also growing interest in whether high-fat diets could help with brain injuries or neurodegenerative diseases, Lowe said. For the everyday dieter, Lowe said, it’s important to consult a registered dietitian.
The recommendations I made in the Grain Brain Whole Life plan favor a mild state of ketosis, which may be the natural state of human metabolism. To be clear, our ancestors didn’t have access to such rich and unlimited sources of sugars and carbohydrates like we do. So, if you are going to adopt the ketogenic diet, as I have, here are three quick tips for ensuring you’re doing it the right way.
Purnell JQ, Hokanson JE, Marcovina SM, Steffes MW, Cleary PA, Brunzell JD. Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: results from the DCCT. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. JAMA. 1998;280:140–146. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.2.140. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes over 16 weeks. Specifically, we wanted to learn the diet's effects on glycemia and diabetes medication use in outpatients who prepared (or bought) their own meals. In a previous article, we reported the results observed in 7 individuals [10]; this report includes data from those 7 individuals along with data from additional participants enrolled subsequently.
Another potential benefit of the ketogenic diet is that it is thought to improve insulin sensitivity5,6. Prediabetics and diabetics are often referred to as “insulin resistant” because their muscle, fat, and liver tissues do not respond properly to insulin. When the pancreas can’t meet the body’s need for insulin, excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, contributing to diabetes and other medical conditions7.
An extensive review published in 2013 looked at the research and evidence of ketogenic diets enhancing fertility (long story short, it looks promising). Studies also show that Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) can be treated effectively with low-carb dieting, which reduces or eliminates symptoms such as infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, acne, and obesity.
One study from 2005 followed 22 people with Type 1 Diabetes for 12 months. The difference here however is they consumed 70-90 grams of carbohydrates per day versus the restrictive less than 20 grams per day on the Ketogenic Diet. Remember my motto? Moderation is the key! The results were positive; less hypoglycemia, insulin requirements were reduced and their A1c dropped from 7.5% to 6.4%.
×