Not only cells that use glucose as fuel become insulin resistant but also chronically inflamed fat cells. When they become insulin resistant, they take up fewer circulating lipids despite high insulin levels. Insulin resistance also increases the release of free fatty acids from fat storage. Free fatty acids in the blood reduce the glucose uptake into muscle cells and further contribute to insulin resistance.


One study from 2005 followed 22 people with Type 1 Diabetes for 12 months. The difference here however is they consumed 70-90 grams of carbohydrates per day versus the restrictive less than 20 grams per day on the Ketogenic Diet. Remember my motto? Moderation is the key! The results were positive; less hypoglycemia, insulin requirements were reduced and their A1c dropped from 7.5% to 6.4%.

For many people, one of the more surprising side effects of starting a ketogenic diet is a bout with the “keto flu.” How so? “When you go on this diet, your kidneys don’t retain as much salt or water, which can lead to flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache, or constipation,” says Laura Saslow, PhD, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. “But these are typically short-lived symptoms that can be prevented or treated by increasing your salt and water intake.” However, if you have high blood pressure, speak with your doctor before adding more sodium to your diet. And know that the keto flu only lasts a week or two; symptoms typically subside once the body adjusts to the diet.


All in all not a bad article. Not going to get into real specifics but like many “trendy diets” some of your claims, despite your applauding effort to site seemingly legitimate sources, are simply inaccurate. First of all MDs are not Nutritionist, they specialize in medicine. Holistic Health coaches specialize in Herbs and using the body to heal itself. Nutritionist/Dietitians focus on proven legitimate evidence to support claims of a basic diet consisting of all 5 food groups for living a healthy lifestyle. Can you live a healthy lifestyle outside of eating the 5 food groups, sure; but you better be well versed on preparation for attempting it. Truth is, any diet, and I mean any reputable diet, on the market can and will work if followed correctly. However, since the beginning of time, civilization has ate wheat as its primary food source and in fact it is still the primary food source worldwide. To eliminate it or complete-whole grains entirely is usually not wise for long term sustainable benefits. Coconut oil is terrible, period. Please never give that advice again. Saturated fat in any form causes arteriosclerosis, cite any heart health clinic or organization in the world for that evidence. Also through starvation, which can occur if the body consistently lacks its basal metabolic needs can and will develop ketoacidosis in a perfectly functioning pancreas. Basically meaning ketosis can develop into ketoacidosis. Again, just trying to provide some further information and clean up your claims. I feel you did a pretty good job touching on a lot of questions/concerns most people have with Keto diets. Like I said, I’m not selling my diet or anything for that matter. I simply want people to realize anything you do requires work, effort and discipline. All in all, it seems more people jumping on the Keto bandwagon are looking for quick results and should be well advised, as you mentioned, on the proper way to eat the right combination of food groups to prevent further deterioration. The right fats, greens and complementary proteins for BCAAs and so on. Truth is a long term Keto diet has not been studied enough to really know if the body is suffering damage long term. At the end of the day moderation, variety and a balanced lifestyle of diet and exercise in combination with the holistic approach (Physical, emotional, spiritual and societal well-being) is the key to long term vitality. Its your lifestyle, not diet that affects your health.
Stream a variety of exercise routines to get you moving and motivated! GlucoseZone™ is a digital exercise program that provides you with personalized exercise guidance and support designed to help you achieve the diabetes and fitness results you want. American Diabetes Association members receive an exclusive discount on their GlucoseZone subscription when they sign up using their ADA member ID!
At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.

Also, diabetics should not undertake the diet without medical supervision. “Trying a ketogenic diet has the power to drastically and quickly lower blood glucose levels,” says Santos-Prowse. “If a person with diabetes is taking blood glucose-lowering medications, their doctor needs to be on board to help with adjusting or stopping the medications as needed.”
The main electrolytes affected by this process are sodium, potassium and magnesium. There are other electrolytes in your bloodstream, such as calcium and phosphorus, but their levels don’t change much on a keto diet. However, getting sodium, magnesium, and potassium in balance can help prevent against symptoms of keto flu and fix some of the side effects you may have long term. Read on to find out more about them.
Difficulty. Many experts question how long a person can realistically give up carbs. “This is a very restrictive diet that requires a drastic change in eating behaviors and even taste,” says Sandra Arevalo, MPH, RDN, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “It isn’t very practical or easy to maintain, for people both with and without diabetes.” That’s not saying you can’t stick with it, but before you commit, make a plan and set measurable goals to help you stay on track. Being prepared with the right foods can also help. Urbanski recommends making a shopping list that focuses on a few basic keto-friendly meals and snacks, so you’ll always have the right foods on hand to ensure success.

Practicing intermittent fasting. This works wonders to help patients get into ketosis. Ideally, you’ll go 13.5–15 hours between dinner and breakfast to help your body find energy reserves beyond stored glucose. (Your body can only store reserves for about 24 hours, so if you are eating much less, intermittent fasting will allow you to drop your storage levels way down, requiring your body to burn fat instead.)
Keto dieters often commiserate about experiencing symptoms as their bodies adjust to the diet, but experts say this period of transition is no joke. "When your body first enters ketosis, you may experience a series of side effects termed the 'keto flu,'" says Jennifer M. Brown, R.D., a faculty associate at Arizona State University's School of Nutrition and Health Promotion. "These include fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, poor sleep, difficulty with exercise, and constipation, all resulting from extreme restriction of carbohydrates." While these symptoms usually subside after the body adjusts to relying on fat for fuel, it can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. Is losing weight really worth potentially feeling ill for three weeks?! "Given that low-carb diets have not been shown to have an advantage when it comes to weight loss, I would say these side effects aren't worth it and are unnecessary," Brown says. (Related: Is It Possible to Follow a Vegetarian Keto Diet?)
Thank you for this comment. It is truth! I keep telling people about this diet. It is literally the best diet I have ever been on. I can eat good food, I feel full, my weight is dropping, I feel better and I can actually feel the difference. While it is great for a professional to be skeptical of emerging diet trends (and lets face it, most diet trends are garbage peddled by snake oil salesmen), this one actually has science from some prestigious institutions behind it, not a marketing scheme.
The level of total cholesterol showed a significant decrease from week 1 to week 24 (Figure 3). The level of HDL cholesterol significantly increased (Figure 4), whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased with treatment (Figure 5). The level of triglycerides decreased significantly after 24 weeks of treatment. The initial level of triglycerides was 2.75±0.23 mmol/L, whereas at week 24, the level decreased to 1.09±0.08 mmol/L (Figure 6). The level of blood glucose significantly decreased at week 24. The initial blood glucose level and its level at the eighth, 16th and 24th week were 7.26±0.38 mmol/L, 5.86±0.27 mmol/L, 5.56±0.19 mmol/L and 5.62±0.18 mmol/L, respectively (Figure 7). The changes in the levels of urea (Figure 8) and creatinine (Figure 9) were not statistically significant.
The alluring promise of the keto diet, potentially filled with as much bacon, butter, eggs, and avocado as you can eat, sounds like the grown-up version of scoring a golden ticket to Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. I mean, who wouldn’t want to chow down on bacon and butter at every meal? Especially if you ended up dropping a few pounds along the way?

A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. More specifically low-carb, high-fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL and decrease in LDL particle concentration compared to low-fat diets.3A study in the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet shows a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, body weight, and blood glucose. Read more on keto and cholesterol >
×