By now, most of us have heard about the ketogenic diet. Whether it's because of the benefits of eating high-fat and low-carb, or because you can eat cheese all day long, it's officially become one of the hottest diets of the year. It may not be easy to cut out all the carbs, but emerging research suggests that eating fat can actually help burn fat. So, for anyone trying to lose weight, you may find it worth the carb cut. Beyond weight loss, recent research has found some other serious health benefits of keto that may impact your life later on. Let's take a look at what the research has to say.
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Ok. I have MCT oil. It’s day six. I got a metallic taste in my mouth last night (day 5), and have had 2 hypoglycemia attacks over night (took small amount of OJ and some 2 tbsp of flaxseed meal with half & half). Slowly felt better throughout the day. Bought just about all the adrenal support products you recommend this a.m. My main issue since last night: my heart has been pounding, non stop. I read it might be cortisol induced reflexive hypoglycemia or something? I’ve never been diagnosed with adrenal exhaustion, but I am noticing tiredness and weight gain (I’m 47). So, the adrenal exhaustion perhaps is self diagnosed (I’m know, so annoying for a physician to hear! I hate saying it myself). But, I’m wondering, if I’m just perimenopausal instead, should I continue on keto? If so, will the heart pounding resolve after a certain time? (Days? Weeks?) Plesse excuse how long this is. Just trying to anticipate questions.

I suggest you or other readers who are not familiar with Dr Wahl's work and research into autoimmune disease and brain biology get a copy of 'The Wahl's Protocol'. Medicine and nutrition are ever-changing sciences and sadly we can't rely on our standard medical practioners (or registered dieticians) to share important research we should all be able to access.
In general, men tend to do better on a long term ketogenic diet than women do. From my own research and experimentation, women can follow a keto diet, but with some adaptions. Most women will do well with a cyclical ketogenic diet when they stay on ketogenic diet most of the time and eat starchy carbohydrates occasionally to spike calories and carbs.

Although many proponents recommend this high fat version of Keto for weight loss, it first gained notoriety as a treatment method for Epilepsy. Going as far back as the 1920’s, medical professionals have recommended high fat Keto Diets as a treatment method for difficult to control seizure disorders. However, a diet that includes a high percentage of fats as part of its eating program increases the daily caloric intake. More calories means slower fat loss. Therefore, the higher calorie count is why this Ketogenic Diet type is considered a slower weight loss model for dieters and is why the Ideal Protein Protocol is a more effective Keto Diet for weight loss.
While sugar may be a great quick form of energy, it doesn’t keep your brain at its best. “There is a lot of evidence coming out which suggests that the brain operates more efficiently on ketones than it does on blood sugar, but the research is all fairly new,” Olin says. “Ketones are made to fuel the brain in the absence of glucose,” says Kristen Mancinelli, a registered dietitian and author of The Ketogenic Diet. “On a normal diet, the brain gets 100 percent of its energy from glucose. On a ketogenic diet, up to two-thirds of the brain’s energy comes from ketones. It’s understandable that brain function would change drastically on a ketogenic diet.” Here are 13 things doctors want you to know about the keto diet.

According to Dr. Sarah Hallberg, an advocate of diabetes reversal with dietary intervention, low-carb diets are the only ones that can possibly reverse this disease. Most studies examining the possibility of diabetes reversal focus on general exercise and reducing calorie intake. Nonetheless, these studies found that lifestyle changes normalize beta cell functioning, meaning reversal is possible.


By now, you've probably heard all about the ketogenic diet, the high-fat, low-carb eating style everyone's talking about. And while the benefits of keto are pretty well-known—weight loss and a suppressed appetite—the downsides are usually minimized by keto advocates. "The positive aspects of a ketogenic diet are spoken about much more than the drawbacks," says Alix Turoff, R.D., C.D.N., C.P.T., a dietitian and personal trainer.
If you’re a part of our community on Facebook, you may remember seeing a study I recently posted regarding the long-term impacts of the ketogenic diet in a study of obese patients. The study, available thanks to the US National Library of Medicine and the NIH, had some very interesting findings on the impact of diet on brain and body health, and my post on the subject saw a lot of traction. Because of that, and because the findings have such importance, I wanted to share the research with you here. The study shows that the ketogenic diet has efficacy as a treatment for Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, depression, migraines, and many other illnesses that plague huge portions of our population. I encourage you to read this study and to learn more.
With fats being my main source of calories, my body and energy levels have never been better. When I educated myself on it and understood the science behind it, it was clear to see why my joints started feeling better, and ailments started to go away. I now have more “oil” lubricating my cells so they’re more receptive/flexible/malleable to the nutrients in my foods. People can loose weight very fast, but honestly the first 10lbs or so is a lot of water weight so that’s really nothing to write home about.
It’s not totally clear whether weight loss achieved on the keto diet can be maintained by most adults once the diet ends, both because the diet can be hard to follow and due to the body adapting metabolically. Long-term studies conducted on animals show that weight loss tends to level off after about six months on the diet, and sometimes may start to creep back up.
So my question to all of you is: why do most people trying to improve their health appear to not care at all about how their food choices impact the earth and the future of all our children? (Not to mention the horrific conditions that the great great majority of animals bred for food endure?) Is it because you have not been told or do not believe how bad it is (our society has many many who are in total denial about global warning, for instance), or is it because you truly don’t care?
Dr. Cabeca came up with the concept of combining an alkaline diet with a keto diet after weighing the benefits of very low-carb eating on one hand, with some of the negative feedback she was receiving from clients on the other. Although many of her clients experienced weight loss quickly and reliably while reducing their intake of carbs, many also reported dealing with side effects like nausea, fatigue and constipation due to the keto diet.
So yes, the ketogenic diet is safe for diabetics. However, they still need to be closely monitored because diabetes medications including insulin, blood pressure, and beta blockers will have to be adjusted down when following a ketogenic diet. Therefore, the diabetic should do this with supervision from a doctor who is up to date with the nutritional literature.
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