“The human digestive tract is simply not well designed for digesting grains. The proteins in grain, especially the gluten, are very difficult to digest, even if you don’t have apparent gluten problems. Too much grain, especially of the highly refined kind, is behind many of the cases of food allergies, irritable bowel, chronic indigestion, and yeast overgrowth that I see every day.”


That might be part of the reason the keto diet is thought to be a better fit for endurance athletes. But even for them, evidence is mixed. "The keto diet has been popular with athletes that engage in long endurance events, because it requires them to rely on less frequent carbohydrate feedings to fuel their exercise (think gummies, drinks, and goos) and more on their body fat stores," Brown explains. "This can decrease uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms (fewer stops at the porta-potties!), but a keto diet can be as challenging to maintain for an athlete as it is for a layperson."
The basis of the muscle wasting argument stems from a misunderstanding of the brains glucose requirements.  If ketones didn’t exist the brain would require much more glucose than it does in the presence of ketones.  During a low carb diet the brain would be forced to break down protein to obtain this glucose.  It would do this through either dietary protein or in the absence of sufficient dietary protein, it would go after body muscle.  Fortunately, once ketosis kicks in the brain is able to obtain 70-75% of its energy requirements from ketones.  The remaining 25% is much more easily obtained from dietary protein and thus body muscle is spared.
The primary drawback of keto for the general population is how restrictive the diet is. “It requires more thought than some other diets,” Santos-Prowse says. And whenever a diet requires too much thought or effort, the likelihood of effectively sticking with it becomes diminished. People just don’t like having to think about how, when, and where to get their next meal when they’re so used to grabbing something quick from the nearest fast food joint.
Registered dietitian Julie Stefanski is based in York and has specialized in the ketogenic diet for more than a decade. She also advocates for anyone starting keto, especially individuals who have not seen a doctor in more than a year, to first see a physician and/or registered dietitian to have their lab work checked and monitored. She also notes there are certain medications that cannot be used while on a ketogenic diet.  
Overcoming multiple sclerosis: Tips for recovery from an MS attack Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease that involves increasing weakness and other symptoms. MS is not usually the same every day, but flares, or attacks, occur, with times of remission in between. Get some tips on how to cope with a flare, how to recover, and how to reduce the risk of symptoms worsening. Read now
It’s no secret that carbs—especially refined ones like sugary cereals, white bread and pasta, or sweet drinks—cause your blood sugar to spike and dip. So it makes sense that eating less of them can help keep things nice and even. For healthy people, this can translate to more steady energy, less brain fog, and fewer sugary cravings, Mancinelli explains.
In fact, the diet first gained popularity in the 1920s when it was discovered to have benefits for children suffering from extreme epilepsy. Now, researchers are conducting studies to determine whether it could have benefits for any number of disorders, including the treatment of ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, diabetes, weight loss, polycystic ovary syndrome, glaucoma, Parkinson’s disease, narcolepsy, and some cancers.
We all already know that the more sensible, healthful way to diet all comes down to doing something that’s sustainable in the long term. And for most, that means eating fewer refined and starchy carbohydrates, and more fruit and vegetables, essential fats, and protein at each meal to improve your health and energy. But it just isn’t as fun or interesting to say, “I’m eating more vegetables and healthy fats!”  
There is a reason why we store hundreds of thousands of calories in the form of fat in our body and only about 2000 calories in the form of glucose (with only a small amount of this useable by the brain). The reason is simple - The body prefers fat as its fuel source. Mark Sisson explains this in his article ‘A metabolic Paradigm Shift, or Why Fat is the Preferred Fuel for Human Consumption’.
"The diet was introduced in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy and then sort of fell out of popularity with the introduction of anti-seizure drugs," Turoff says. What's more, ketosis (the goal of keto, a state where the body uses fat for energy instead of carbs) is something seen in people during periods of starvation—including in people with anorexia nervosa. "The body is deprived of carbohydrates and thus has to turn to ketone bodies as a fuel source," Turoff explains. "People really need to understand that it's not just a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet—it actually changes the way your body uses fuel."
Hey Marcy! Simply have one higher carb day per week where you consume healthy carb sources like fresh fruit, sweet potatoes, or white rice cooked in coconut oil! Saturday is usually a great day for this! Start with just one higher carb meal on Saturday for about a month and see how that works! This article has more information: https://drjockers.com/follow-cyclic-ketogenic-diet/
“Loss of muscle mass as we age has a number of serious consequences,” notes Clark. “Muscle is metabolically active and helps boost daily energy expenditure and mitigate age-related weight gain.” Losing muscle mass can also decrease functional strength and heighten the risk of falls, notes Clark. Falls are the top cause of death from injury in older populations, according to the Institute of Medicine Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.
The problem comes when people remain ketotic for extended periods. We know with confidence that long-term ketosis poses substantial risk for health complications because thousands of children have followed ketogenic diets over the years as a means of suppressing intractable grand mal seizures unresponsive to drugs, seizures that can lead to irreversible brain damage if not stopped. A ketogenic diet reduces seizures by approximately 55%. Because seizures are a chronic problem, these kids maintain ketosis for months to years.
We do recommend everyone eat something every 4-5 hours to maintain a healthy metabolism. If your meals are more than 4-5 hours apart, a snack consisting of a protein and a carbohydrate is a great choice. The protein will help fill you up quicker and keep you feeling satisfied between meals. The protein also has a slower effect on your blood glucose than most carbohydrates, so when paired with carbohydrates, your blood sugar will not spike nearly as high. We recommend eating a protein with every meal and snack.
Therefore, when you’re following a ketogenic diet plan for beginners, your body is burning fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, so in the process most people lose weight and excess body fat rapidly, even when consuming lots of fat and adequate calories through their daily food intake. Another major benefit of the keto diet is that there’s no need to count calories, feel hungry or attempt to burn loads of calories through hours of intense exercise.
She has found that when women stick to eating a lighter dinner, and then abstain from eating for about 13–15 hours between dinner and breakfast, they experience improvements in their weight, blood sugar control, etc. She recommends that women try avoiding eating after 8 p.m. or experiment with eating only two meals per day, with tea or broth between meals to help curb hunger. Another option is to try skipping dinner altogether on 1–2 days per week. For most women, when attempting IMF, it’s not recommended to snack between meals unless the woman is very active (such as an athlete in training) or dealing with a hormonal issue such as adrenal burnout.

Ok. I have MCT oil. It’s day six. I got a metallic taste in my mouth last night (day 5), and have had 2 hypoglycemia attacks over night (took small amount of OJ and some 2 tbsp of flaxseed meal with half & half). Slowly felt better throughout the day. Bought just about all the adrenal support products you recommend this a.m. My main issue since last night: my heart has been pounding, non stop. I read it might be cortisol induced reflexive hypoglycemia or something? I’ve never been diagnosed with adrenal exhaustion, but I am noticing tiredness and weight gain (I’m 47). So, the adrenal exhaustion perhaps is self diagnosed (I’m know, so annoying for a physician to hear! I hate saying it myself). But, I’m wondering, if I’m just perimenopausal instead, should I continue on keto? If so, will the heart pounding resolve after a certain time? (Days? Weeks?) Plesse excuse how long this is. Just trying to anticipate questions.
In part, keto diet weight loss is a real thing because high-fat, low-carb diets can both help diminish hunger and boost weight loss through their hormonal effects. As described above, when we eat very little foods that supply us with carbohydrates, we release less insulin. With lower insulin levels, the body doesn’t store extra energy in the form of fat for later use, and instead is able to reach into existing fat stores for energy.
Walking, stretching, or doing gentle yoga or other mind-body exercise should be fine and may even help you feel better. But when your body is already under stress from trying to adapt to a new fuel system, don’t place an additional burden on it by attempting any type of strenuous workout. Take it easy for the first few weeks and then slowly increase your exercise intensity.
Fresh fruits supply only a small fraction of the fructose Americans consume (the biggest source is sugary beverages). Sugar in fruit is accompanied by healthful nutrients and antioxidants, as well as fiber, which slows absorption of fructose so it’s highly unlikely that the fructose in even very sweet fruit could have any undesirable health effects.
From baseline to week 16, the mean body weight decreased significantly from 131.4 ± 18.3 kg to 122.7 ± 18.9 kg, BMI decreased from 42.2 ± 5.8 kg/m2 to 39.4 ± 6.0 kg/m2, and waist circumference from 130.0 ± 10.5 cm to 123.3 ± 11.3 cm (Table ​(Table3).3). The percent change in body weight was -6.6%. The mean percent body fat decreased from 40.4 ± 5.8% to 37.0 ± 6.0%. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures did not change significantly over the 16 weeks. The mean heart rate decreased from 81.2 ± 12.9 beats per minute to 74.6 ± 14.0 beats per minute (p = 0.01). 

Until recently, ketosis was viewed with apprehension in the medical world; however, current advances in nutritional research have discounted this apprehension and increased public awareness about its favourable effects. In humans, ketone bodies are the only additional source of brain energy after glucose (23,24). Thus, the use of ketone bodies by the brain could be a significant evolutionary development that occurred in parallel with brain development in humans. Hepatic generation of ketone bodies during fasting is essential to provide an alternate fuel to glucose. This is necessary to spare the destruction of muscle from glucose synthesis.
An article published in the New York Times in 2018 explores the use of a keto diet and diabetes type 1. The article points out how many diabetes experts will not recommend low-carb diets for type 1 diabetics, especially if they are children, due to concerns over hypoglycemia as a result of carb restriction and the possibility of this having a negative effect on a child’s growth.
Sleep improvements are a bit more of a mystery. Studies have shown that ketogenic dieting improves sleep by decreasing REM and increasing slow-wave sleep patterns. While the exact mechanism is unclear, it likely is related to the complex biochemical shifts involving the brain’s use of ketones for energy combined with other body tissues directly burning fat.
I had type 1 diabetes for 30+ yrs; CKD/ESRD x8 yrs and did peritoneal dialysis for 5 yrs before getting a kidney pancreas transplant nearly 5 years ago. Then had a below knee amputation and a rather sedentry life since-need to lose weight. Is this a safe diet for me? I am terrified of ketosis (DKA nearly killed me when i was 12 yrs old) so anything messing with stuff like that really makes me nervous. TIA!
Combine that with the fact that your body is excreting more water, and you have a potential recipe for clogged pipes. You can keep things moving by getting some fiber from keto-friendly foods like avocado, nuts, and limited portions of non-starchy vegetables and berries, says David Nico, PhD, author of Diet Diagnosis. Upping your water intake helps, too.
Such great info. Husband has been seizure free 11 months. Was having 2-3 per month. Learning new and great awesome recipes. There is one side affect, I have lost 40#, our daughter, has lost 70#. However, my husband has not lost any weight. His body was at the correct weight before we started. My goal is not weight loss, that’s just lagniappe, my goal is better health. This is such an awesome journey.

“Despite its temporary side effects, we have always suspected that the ketogenic diet is relatively safe long term, and we now have proof,” says senior investigator Eric Kossoff, M.D., a pediatric neurologist and director of the ketogenic diet program at Hopkins Children’s. “Our study should help put to rest some of the nagging doubts about the long-term safety of the ketogenic diet,” he adds. 
If you are looking to implement a ketogenic diet into your life and don’t know where to begin, these articles can be great resources for you: How To Follow A Ketogenic Diet & 10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips. I have also developed an in-depth program that provides you with everything you need to implement a ketogenic diet for maximum benefits: Ketogenic Program.
They have high likelihood of calcium oxalate and uric acid kidney stones–Kidney stones are uncommon in childhood, yet these kids commonly have kidney stones. The risk in an adult on a prolonged ketogenic effort is therefore high, also. Kidney stones are not benign–they are painful and can occasionally result in kidney damage (increased creatinine, urinary tract infections, etc.)
The bottom line? If you’re thinking about trying the ketogenic diet, run it by your doctor first — regardless of any preexisting health conditions. And consult a registered dietitian nutritionist (find one at EatRight.org) to find a nutrition professional who can work with you to create a meal plan you can stick to. People with kidney disease or a history of disordered eating should avoid the diet, and people with type 1 diabetes may want to avoid it, as well. If you have risk factors for heart disease, you’ll want to speak with your doctor before considering the diet.
So where did the ketogenic diet come from? Interestingly enough, this fad diet didn’t spark from a celebrity endorsement or some guy missing a medical license. There’s evidence of the keto diet being used back in the early 1920s to treat severe childhood epilepsy and it’s still being used today for that purpose. Research suggests that the production of ketones may influence neurotransmitter activity in neurons allowing for a reduction in seizure attacks. A recent Cochrane Review demonstrated a 30-40% reduction in seizures compared with non-keto diet controls. One thing to keep in mind, however (which is a theme when discussing the keto diet) is that it’s generally difficult to adhere to and difficult to tolerate for a lot of people. In other words, people go on it and then come off it pretty damn quick.
"Many of the richest sources of fiber, like beans, fruit, and whole grains are restricted on the ketogenic diet," registered dietician Edwina Clark told Everyday Health. "As a result, ketogenic eaters miss out on the benefits of fiber-rich diet such as regular laxation and microbiome support. The microbiome has been implicated in everything from immune function to mental health."
Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors.
At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.
Overcoming multiple sclerosis: Tips for recovery from an MS attack Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease that involves increasing weakness and other symptoms. MS is not usually the same every day, but flares, or attacks, occur, with times of remission in between. Get some tips on how to cope with a flare, how to recover, and how to reduce the risk of symptoms worsening. Read now
In this study, researchers compared the impact of a low-carbohydrate diet and three other diets on blood pressure and other measures of cardiovascular fitness in women. After the 12 month trial, all subjects who successfully completed their respective diet experienced notable reductions in body mass, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol. Those in the low-carbohydrate diet group, however, had the best results.
Figuring out a diet that fuels our body’s needs and keeps us healthy without sacrificing taste is a daunting task for anyone. Factor in diabetes and this task can suddenly seem like an insurmountable obstacle overcome only by the most health-conscious fitness guru. Some diets are clearly fads, popping up into existence seemingly overnight, selling books and recipes and often food itself, only to fade into the twilight and be overtaken the next day by yet another set of guidelines by which we are to become, optimistically, the best self we can be.
However, the lower calorie Keto Diet also features a reduction in fats as well. In doing so, this Keto Diet accelerates fat loss and is better suited for losing weight. After all, between 2 Ketogenic Diet types, with one having a higher caloric intake than the second, which do you think would be the better choice for weight loss? Obviously the lower calorie diet. By reducing fats, your caloric intake is also reduced. As a result, the dieter’s weight loss will occur more rapidly.
In a second study,2 a Harvard-led research team evaluated the benefit of a ketogenic diet in both children and adults with type 1 diabetes despite concerns about a possible negative effect on growth and development in children following such a restricted diet. These researchers report "exceptional" glucose control with little adverse effects. However, the participants were recruited from a closed Facebook group, TypeOneGrit, for people who follow a diet and diabetes program based on the recommendations in the Diabetes Solution,3 a book by Richard K Bernstein, MD, who devised this program to manage his own type 1 diabetes.
The basis of the muscle wasting argument stems from a misunderstanding of the brains glucose requirements.  If ketones didn’t exist the brain would require much more glucose than it does in the presence of ketones.  During a low carb diet the brain would be forced to break down protein to obtain this glucose.  It would do this through either dietary protein or in the absence of sufficient dietary protein, it would go after body muscle.  Fortunately, once ketosis kicks in the brain is able to obtain 70-75% of its energy requirements from ketones.  The remaining 25% is much more easily obtained from dietary protein and thus body muscle is spared.

Bingo!! It’s all about the $. The info graphic at the very beginning is labeled Keto-Paleo. And is misleading. Contrary to popular belief the Paleo diet is plant based. It restricts carbohydrate and dairy consumption based on foods that cause an inflammatory response in the body. Keto restricts foods that cause a blood sugar spike two very different purposes. American nutrition is very obviously broken and any recommendation tied to a money making association should be taken with a grain of salt because you can bet there are $$ strings attached. Usually big Pharma funding.
It is generally believed that high fat diets may lead to the development of obesity and several other diseases such as coronary artery disease, diabetes and cancer. This view, however, is based on studies carried out in animals that were given a high fat diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, our laboratory has recently shown that a ketogenic diet modified the risk factors for heart disease in obese patients (12).
I teach ADA. I saw 49 people in 8 months. All except 1 lost weight and had A1C reduction. 16 reversed their condition. All this on ADA diet. ADA works, you just have to follow it. Keto will work also, I just do not believe that it is healthy in the long term. We need more study results, and evidence that it works before we recommend that everyone should go on a keto diet. I would recommend that any of you who are on keto diet, and who are adamant that it works, and that ADA does not, should look for clinical trials and become subjects. We will need to know scientifically that it works, not just by word of mouth. And we will need to see medical evidence that it helps. If there is science behind it, I am sure that ADA will get behind it. Their are medical programs where you can be followed on a keto diet. Look for those.
The end result of the “ketone diet” is staying fueled off of circulating high ketones (which are also sometimes called ketone bodies) — which is what’s responsible for altering your metabolism in a way that some people like to say turns you into a “fat-burning machine.” Both in terms of how it feels physically and mentally, along with the impact it has on the body, being in ketosis is very different than a “glycolytic state,” where blood glucose (sugar) serves as the body’s energy source.
Studies are emerging that ketogenic diets (in conjunction with other treatments) can either reverse progressive brain disorders or help repair the damage. These include traumatic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. The Wahl’s Protocol also utilizes this benefit of the ketogenic diet to help repair neurological damage from multiple sclerosis.
×