ME: It is not essential. You can be fully ketogenic without any intermittent fasting. However, most people find it natural to do intermittent fasting as their hunger is reduced to where they don’t need a third meal. Keeping feeding time reduced to a smaller window during the day enables the body to use stored body fat for fuel longer, which benefits weight loss. My husband Craig and I still do intermittent fasting every day as maintenance. It just makes life easier only having to make two meals a day instead of three.

It usually takes three to four days for your body to go into ketosis because you have to use up your body's stores of glucose, i.e., sugar first, Keatley says. Any major diet change can give you some, uh, issues, and Keatley says he often sees patients who complain of IBS-like symptoms and feeling wiped out at the beginning of the diet. (The tiredness happens because you have less access to carbs, which give you quick energy, he explains.)
However, we need to consider that most of these studies failed to equate for both calories and protein, and it is likely that if similar weight loss was achieved, these health outcomes would look similar regardless of the diet used. This is supported by the Johnston study from Arizona state which saw similar outcomes when calories and protein were equated.
There is nothing inherently difficult about following a ketogenic diet. We have many patients who do this very easily over many years. The metabolic benefits significantly outway any perceived challenges from limiting particular food types. Uptake would be far more widespread if nutrition professionals left their predujical opinions of SFA’s behind. Finally, given the expertise in Ketogenic Diets at Harvard, Dr David Ludwig, for one springs to mind, I am surprised the author did not avail themselves of the local expertise.
So where did the ketogenic diet come from? Interestingly enough, this fad diet didn’t spark from a celebrity endorsement or some guy missing a medical license. There’s evidence of the keto diet being used back in the early 1920s to treat severe childhood epilepsy and it’s still being used today for that purpose. Research suggests that the production of ketones may influence neurotransmitter activity in neurons allowing for a reduction in seizure attacks. A recent Cochrane Review demonstrated a 30-40% reduction in seizures compared with non-keto diet controls. One thing to keep in mind, however (which is a theme when discussing the keto diet) is that it’s generally difficult to adhere to and difficult to tolerate for a lot of people. In other words, people go on it and then come off it pretty damn quick.

Good article. A friend at work is stating this diet and of course being new at it, he is quite the Zealot. I have been into nutrition and exercise for over 40 years (57 years old now). I have tried s few different eating philosophies (I never use the word the word diet. Negative connotation and dieting isn’t good the way most practice it.). Eating Keto style and the logic behind it aren’t too different than some others. And you pointed out many of the misconceptions about cholesterol and triglycerides ect. For about the last 20 plus years I have pretty much followed a “Zone” type diet. 40% carbs, 30% fat, 30% protein. And I always get weird looks at the 30% fat part. Well, I’m 57 with 7% body fat. Not bad for and old guy. I work out and I supplement with protein as I lift weights. It’s worked well. The ratios may be different, but the emphasis on vegetable carbs and good fats are the key to either way to eat. There were only a couple things that kinda struck me as something that made me go hmmmmm. Using the Inuit people isn’t a good example really. They have evolved some different physical features over hundreds of years than we have. And there is no evidence if ketosis occurring in examination. And somehow when you mention eating large amounts of animal fat, just hit me as counterintuitive. It’s a much different fat than an avocado. Finally, and this is just me, I love fruit. True it’s probably less efficient, but its good, sweet, and beats the hell outta donuts for your health. It fulfills the reward need many of us have. I also feel if God put it on the earth naturally, it’s got a place in our food source. I’ve had a philosophy about excersise that’s served me well. What’s the best exercise? The one that you’ll do regularly. Get up and move and find out what works for your own body. It applies to good too. If you feel deprived or for various reasons can’t stay on the supposed best food program, what good is it? But if you stay with more natural and Balanced foods that usually leads to more energy then more and regular excerise. Check in. It looks like it’s been 2 years since you wrote this. I’d live to hear how your doing.
For the ketogenic eating plan, participants were instructed to reduce non-fiber-containing carbohydrates to between 20 and 50 grams a day, with no calorie restriction. The group following the plate method were told to eat their meals on a nine-inch plate, filling half of it with non-starchy vegetables (eg, greens, peppers, broccoli, carrots), ¼ of the plate with whole grains (eg, brown rice, sweet potatoes, whole wheat bread) and adding lean protein (eg, skinless chicken, turkey, fish, and seafood) to the last quarter of the plate.1
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes over 16 weeks. Specifically, we wanted to learn the diet's effects on glycemia and diabetes medication use in outpatients who prepared (or bought) their own meals. In a previous article, we reported the results observed in 7 individuals [10]; this report includes data from those 7 individuals along with data from additional participants enrolled subsequently.

Studies are emerging that ketogenic diets (in conjunction with other treatments) can either reverse progressive brain disorders or help repair the damage. These include traumatic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. The Wahl’s Protocol also utilizes this benefit of the ketogenic diet to help repair neurological damage from multiple sclerosis.
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